Challenging authority and social disservice

First and foremost, I would like to say welcome to the first ever blog posting of OYAB. As you read our profile you can see that we are focused and dedicated to highlighting acts of brilliance on large and small scales domestic and abroad without discrimination. We felt it was very important to make a concerted effort to acknowledge local maybe not so public knowledge acts of what we perceive to be Obviously Young And Brilliant or “Oy- Yabe” as we like to call it. With that being said lets get to our Oy-Yabe blog premier entry.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/nyregion/05hunter.html?n=Top/Reference/Times%20Topics/Subjects/G/Gifted%20Students?ref=giftedstudents&pagewanted=1

http://www.nytimes.com/packages/pdf/speech.pdf?ref=nyregion

What makes this story OYAB:

Back in June of 2010 during the graduation ceremony of the prestigious Hunter College High School in New York City Justin Hudson delivered his graduation speech to his fellow graduates. A valedictorian speech is a regular occurrence at any high school graduation ceremony but very few shake up long standing tradition, procedures and create a divide how he did on this day. You see, what happened that day took the heart and courage of someone with great BRILLIANCE and awareness of social and civil unfairness to address on the stage and format that he did. Mr. Hudson knew that to address such an issue at any time other than on his way out could prove detrimental to the completion of his education at the current institution, but made it extremely clear about how he felt about the social disservices being manufactured by the entry exam of the high school where he just completed his high school requirements. When you read his speech you will see that he utilized a very articulate and descriptive manner to make his point and to ensure that his voice was heard to the tune of national attention as this story gained the attention of such publications as the New York Times. We see Mr. Hudson as a person of Oy- Yabe proportions due to his willingness to take a stance against authority, as a regular kid from New York City who saw fault in a system that he was a part of he stood up and challenged a thought for change. For this Mr. Hudson we salute you and acknowledge your act of brilliance.

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6 thoughts on “Challenging authority and social disservice

  1. sir justin hudson is very very impressive when we are surrounded by a youth who believes in the “you owe me” and “let me get mine” era. so many young people have a sense of entitlement never paying attention to other situations around them and here mr hudson took into account all of that. kudos to justin and kudos to you guys for highlighting this oyab moment

    • I couldnt have said it better myself. The perceived “generation X’er” showing that his “X” stands for nothing less than doing whats extraordinary Big Ups to this young man. I believe every parent should pass this example on to their children as a way to know that you have a voice and just because your one person doesnt mean you wont be heard. This young man made the New York times!!!

  2. This story brought me to tears as well. On two fronts. Joyful upon reading this college-level written indictment of the NYC education system by a socially conscious young Black male! True brilliance. It also made me want to cry for my child and all of our children because he is absolutely correct. Education is now a privilege and as much as I fight for access to “top” schools I know without money it is unlikely. I have dreamed of her attending Hunter full knowing it is a double edged sword as she will be exposed to children of privilege. I don’t like the system but it is the only one we have to work within. Mr. Hudson has given me hope!

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